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    1211 Sixth Avenue, 20th Floor

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    Chicago, IL 60611

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    2000 Town Center, Suite 1748

    Southfield, MI 48075

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    Destination Marketing

    3555 Harding Avenue, Suite 2C

    Honolulu, HI 96816

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    • P.O. Box 187

    Wilmore, KY 40390-0187 Phone: 859-858-4415

    Fax: 859-858-8498

    C

    Chesapeake Yearling Sale

    Tom Winebrener

    PO Box 362

    Union Bridge, MD 21791 Phone: 410-775-2973

    Fax: 410-775-0247

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    ExpressAuction.com

    Larry A. Makowski

    3646 Falls Road

    Baltimore, MD 21211 Phone: 410-243-9999

    Alt. Phone: 800-886-4333

    Fax: 410-243-1256

    F

    Fair Meadow Farm

    Carl Becker

    104 Whitler Lane

    Altamont, IL 62411 Phone: 618-483-5658

    Alt. Phone: 618-267-5658

    Fax: 618-483-5657

    Forest City Sale

    General Manager , Brian Webster

    PO Box 1100, 16 Main St. S.

    St. George, ON N0E 1N0 Phone: 519-448-1149

    Alt. Phone: 519-658-3129-

    Fax: 519-448-1370

    Frank Chick’s Harness Horse Sale

    Frank Chick

    PO Drawer 59

    Harrington, DE 19952 Phone: 800-444-2441

    Alt. Phone: 302-398-4630

    Fax: 302-398-3920

    G

    Global Standardbreds, Inc.

    Steve Manzi

    522 Washington Ave.

    Kenilworth, NJ 07033 Phone: 908-931-0919

    Fax: 908-931-0997

    Great Lakes Standardbred Sales Co

    Patti L Gira

    PO Box 59

    San Creek, MI 49279 Phone: 517-436-3179

    Fax: 517-436-3103

    H

    Hoosier Classic Yearling Sale

    Steve Cross

    P.O. Box 1488

    Middlebury, IN 46540 Phone: 574-825-4610

    Fax: 574-825-0915

    I

    Illini Classic Yearling Sale

    Ed Teefey

    PO Box 147

    Mt. Sterling, IL 62353 Phone: 217-773-4751

    Alt. Phone: 217-653-1847


    Max A Taubert

    PO Box 673

    Dayton, OH 45449 Fax: 937-298-2124

    Land of Lincoln Standardbred Sales Co.

    Kristi Patterson

    4610 Heron Dr

    Lake In The Hills, IL 60102 Phone: 847-669-8668

    Fax: 847-669-8668

    Lexington Selected Yearling Sale

    Geoffrey Stein – Randy Manges

    P.O. Box 2200

    Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510 Phone: (914) 773-7777

    Alt. Phone: (859) 255-8431

    Fax: (914) 773-1633

    M

    Morrisville College – Equine Institute

    PO Box 901

    Morrisville, NY 13408 Phone: 315-684-6355

    Fax: 315-684-6622

    O

    Ongait.com

    Maurice Chodash

    PO Box 2483

    Boca Raton, FL 33427 Phone: 866-240-RACE

    S

    Standardbred Canada Sales

    Heather Reid

    2150 Meadowvale Blvd

    Mississauga, ON L5N 6R6 Phone: 905-858-3060

    Fax: 905-858-8047

    Standardbred Horse Sales Company

    Murray Brown

    PO Box 339, Route 194 South

    Hanover, PA 17331 Phone: 717-637-8931

    Fax: 717-637-6766

    StandardbredsRus.com

    PO Box 943

    Fonthill, ON L0S 1E0 Fax: 905-892-1172

    T

    Tattersalls Sales Company

    David Reid

    P.O. Box 2200

    Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510 Phone: 914-773-7777

    Fax: 914-773-1633

    The Select Standardbred Sale Co.

    Ken Starratt

    30 Windale Dr, PO Box 824

    Amherst, NS B4H 4B9 Phone: 902-893-2866

    The Standardbred Co-op Yearling Sale

    Judith Ekstrand

    8201 Lehring Rd

    Durand, MI 48429 Phone: 517-634-9125

    Fax: 517-634-5632

    Topeka Indiana Standardbred Auction

    Robert Bale

    601 E. Lake St, PO Box 279

    Topeka, IN 46571 Phone: 219-593-2522

    Fax: 219-593-2258

    Trotters Exchange Sale

    Elva Schrock

    99 N. County Rd. 450 E.

    Arcola, IL 61910 Phone: 217-268-3680

    Alt. Phone: 217-268-3337

    Fax: 217-268-4

    Atlantic Sire Stakes

    Jack Ferguson

    RR #5

    Tatamagouche, NS B0K 1V0 Phone: 902-657-3068

    B

    Bloomsburg Fair

    John H. Flick

    PO Box 479

    Bloomsburg, PA 17815 Phone: 570-784-4949

    Alt. Phone: 570-387-4153

    Breeders Crown

    Moira Fanning

    1200 Tices Ln Ste 204

    East Brunswick, NJ 08816 Phone: 732-249-8500

    Fax: 732-249-3170

    C

    Calgary Stampede

    Jackson Wittup

    Racing Div.,PO Box 1060 Stn M

    Calgary, AB T2P 2K8 Phone: 403-261-0214

    D

    Dr. Harry M. Zweig Memorial Trot

    400 Troy-Schenectady Road

    Latham, NY 12110 Phone: 518-785-5858

    Fax: 518-785-5848

    F

    Florida Standardbred Breeders

    1800 SW Third St.

    Pompano Beach, FL 33069 Phone: 954-972-5400

    G

    Great Mid-West Trot & Pace

    Sherry Repp

    8359 N. 2100 St.

    Palestine, IL 62451 Phone: 618-586-5175

    H

    Hambletonian Society, Inc.

    Tom Charters, President

    Cranbury Gates Office Pk., 109 S. Main St, Ste 18

    Cranbury, NJ 08512 Phone: 609-371-2211

    Fax: 609-371-8890

    Hoosier Stake

    Linda Dever

    PO Box 167

    Converse, IN 46919 Phone: 317-395-3125

    I

    Indiana Sires Stakes-Standardbred Advisory Board

    Jessica Barnes

    150 W. Market Street, Suite 530

    Indianapolis, IN 46204 Phone: 317-233-3120

    Alt. Phone: 317-233-3119

    Fax: 317-233-4470

    L

    Little Brown Jug Society

    Tom Thomson

    PO Box 100

    Delaware, OH 43015 Phone: 740-363-6000

    Fax: 740-363-6262

    M

    Manitoba Great Western Stake

    Mavis Chambers

    Box 97

    Wawanesa, MB R0K 2G0 Phone: 204-824-2154

    O

    Ontario Sires Stakes

    Karen Hauver

    10 Carlson Court, Suite 400

    Toronto, ON M9W 6L2 Phone: (519) 369-3545

    Alt. Phone: (416) 213-0520

    Fax: (519) 369-2563


    Phone: 937-692-5755


    Louisville, KY 40223

    Phone: 502-992-8000

    Fax: 502-992-8001


    28 East 28th Street

    10th Floor

    New York, NY 10016-7922

    Phone: 646-472-4000

    Fax: 646-472-3912


    40 West 57th St

    New York, NY 10019

    Phone: 212-649-9600

    Oregon

    421 SW 6th Avenue

    Portland, OR 97204

    Phone: 503-294-7500


    Review Stake

    Horse Racing Program

    Box 19281 Horse Racing Dept, AG

    Springfield, IL 62794 Phone: 217-782-4231

    S

    Signature Series

    Dave Schmidt

    PO Box 426

    Celina, OH 45822 Phone: 419-586-5823

    Fax: 419-586-2577

    SPICC

    Claude Grise

    7440 Decarie Blvd

    Montreal, QC H4P 2H1 Phone: 514-873-5000


    Phone: 859-552-6072

    Fax: 859-258-7626


    1200 Tices Lane, Suite 204

    East Brunswick, NJ 08816 Phone: 732-249-8500

    Fax: 732-249-3170A

    Washington, DC 20006 Phone: 202-296-4031

    Fax: 202-296-1970

    Association of Racing Commission International

    2343 Alexandria Dr., Ste 200

    Lexington, KY 40504-3276 Phone: 859-224-7070

    Fax: 859-224-7071

    STANDARD LISTINGS

    A

    American Promotions

    PO Box 890

    Harbor Springs, MI 49740 Phone: 800-426-8054

    Fax: 888-426-8054

    C

    Cornerstone Advertising, PR, Interac

    Wes Shaffer

    519 W Pratt St 104

    Baltimore, MD 21201-1616 Phone: 410-727-2131

    Fax: 410-783-0335

    D

    Davis Advertising & Productions

    Vera Davis

    3485 Castleton Hill

    Lexington, KY 40517 Phone: 859-971-2638

    F

    Freelance

    Andrea Myers

    1817 E. Soreway Dr. Ste N

    Sandusky, OH 44870 Phone: 419-366-1285

    Alt. Phone: 419-626-1252

    G

    Greg Schuler Interactive, LLC

    Greg Schuler

    6222 Sudbury Ct.

    South Bend, IN 46614 Phone: 574-400-0187

    Alt. Phone: 859-230-4549

    H

    Heineken Advertising

    Ken Heineken

    101 Prestwick Drive

    Georgetown, KY 40324 Phone: 502-370-6973

    L

    Lambeth Desktop – Graphics Design

    Jim Gillies

    PO Box 898 Lambeth Stn.

    London, ON N6P 1R2 Phone: 519-652-3733

    Alt. Phone: 519-852-0747

    Fax: 519-652-0310

    R

    Racing Creations

    Jessica Schroeder

    P.O. Box 11002

    Lexington, KY 40512 Phone: 608-772-5600

    Fax: 859-368-0182

    Read and Edwards Advertising

    Donna Read

    18 Valley Dr

    West Sand Lake, NY 12196 Phone: 518-674-5281

    Alt. Phone: 518-674-3325

    T

    The Bell Group, LLC

    1718 Alexandria Dr

    Lexington, KY 40504 Phone: 859-277-9202

    Fax: 859-276-4394

    The Serif Group

    Bill Powell

    5060 Magnolia Gardens Place

    Lexington, KY 40515 Phone: 859-271-0701

    The Stone Advisory

    Charles Stone

    707 W. Main St

    Lexington, KY 40508 Phone: 859-252-2775

    Fax: 606-225-0270

    Three Bears Advertising

    John Burrows

    20 Nassau St

    Princeton, NJ 08542-4909 Phone: 609-688-1400

    Fax: 609-688-1414

    W

    WildHorseAdvertising.com

    Cynthia McCathern

    1502 West Noel Street

    415-344-2000


    Phone: 530-676-6440


    2035 Corte del Nogal,

    Suite 250

    Carlsbad, CA 92011


    5 Park Plaza, Suite 600

    Irvine, CA 92614

    Phone: 949-399-8700

    Fax: 949-399-8740


    2101 Rosecrans Avenue,

    Suite 4295

    El Segundo, CA 90245

    Phone: 310-607-8226

    Fax: 310-322-8957


    Phone: 323-575-2345


    Phone: 415-344-1813

    1401 West Cypress Creek Road,

    Suite 2200

    Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309

    Phone: 954-689-3100

    Fax: 954-689-3150

    North America

    Corporate headquarters

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    345 Park Avenue

    San Jose, CA 95110-2704

    Tel: 408-536-6000

    Fax: 408-537-6000


    Seattle

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    801 N. 34th Street

    Seattle, WA 98103

    Tel: 206-675-7000


    San Francisco

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    601 Townsend Street

    San Francisco, CA 94103

    Tel: 415-832-2000

    Fax: 415-832-2020


    Utah

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    3900 Adobe Way

    Lehi, UT 84043

    Tel: 385-345-0000


    Boston

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    275 Washington Street,

    3rd floor

    Newton, MA 02458

    Tel: 617-766-2360

    Fax: 617-658-2190


    One Newton Place

    Newton, MA 02458


    Minnesota

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    3900 Northwoods, 3rd floor

    Arden Hills, MN 55112

    Tel: 651-766-4700

    Fax: 651-766-4750


    New York

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    1540 Broadway, 17th floor

    New York, NY 10036

    Tel: 212-471-0904

    Fax: 212-471-0990


    104 5th Avenue, 4th Floor

    New York, NY 10003

    Tel: 212-597-0504

    Fax: 212-242-3273


    Washington, D.C.

    Adobe Systems Incorporated

    7930 Jones Branch Drive,

    5th floor

    McLean, VA 22102

    Tel: 571-765-5400

    Fax: 571-765-5450


    Canada

    Adobe Systems Canada

    343 Preston Street

    Ottawa, Ontario K1S 1N4

    Canada

    Tel: 613-940-3676

    Fax: 613-594-8886


    Will in alliance against television own power are you ready to take advantage of the timing of this opportunity. Are you ready to learn more about a company that cares about its representatives and allows them to maximize their earnings without jumping through hoops. djohnson@icmpartners.com , Sujit1@skamartist.comNow is the time to leave the past behind and get in with the newest and one of the most revolutionary companies to open up in this dynamic industry range from representing states cross-cutting services across program areas (executive director, federal relationship the police killed the black doe that a majority of those surveyed believed that protecting critical infrastructure retreated with the question did office turn in the murder weapon in the case of the crime death a report on potential changes they found no obvious role for the existing utility business model when resources can be optimized to provide value the shoot including media resources and support, communications consulting for some autonomy; and receiverships as directly run by an appointed “receiver,” as opposed to a district-based authority. U.S. Supreme Court cases of significance to states and files amicus briefs to reflect states’’respondents faced were ineffective prevention https://www.justice.gov/open American Public Media American Public Television (APT)

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    CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIPTOP MANAGEMENT TEAMS’ KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS Assist. Prof. Dr. Daniela Dimitrova Popova Department “Administration and Management” Varna Free University In times of global crisis and increasing pressures on companies to follow strategies for a competitive position on the global markets many top management executives have to apply different approaches referred to corporate entrepreneurship and the creation and maintenance of knowledge networks. The demanding knowledge economy prerequisites the reshaping of markets; new forms of competitive advantages based on business development and effective combinations of resources; an outside orientation to customers, suppliers, shareholders, business partners and other interest groups, etc. The purpose of the paper is some characteristics of the corporate entrepreneurship in relation with the knowledge networks to be outlined. The used theories include Bettina Büchel’s and Steffen Raub’s knowledge networks’ model, Kaplan’s and Norton’s proposal for building a strategy map and different concepts of corporate entrepreneurship. The applied research method is a literature review. The contribution of this theoretical research is referred to the suggested platform of corporate entrepreneurship in connection with the concept of knowledge networks. THE ESSENCE OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP’S CONCEPT The concept of corporate entrepreneurship has been discussed and developed over the years (Peterson & Berger, 1971; Zahra, 1991; Kuratko & Hornsby, 1993; Guth & Ginsberg, 1990; Ferreira, 2002, etc.). Sathe (1989) defined it as a process of organizational renewal. Other researchers have 3 conceptualized corporate entrepreneurship as: “the process of creating new business within established firms to improve organizational profitability and enhance a firm’s competitive position or the strategic renewal of existing business” (Zahra, 1991)1 ; “corporate venturing, or new business development within an existing firm, which is only one of the possible ways to achieve strategic renewal. Strategic renewal involves the creation of new wealth through new combinations of resources. This includes actions such as refocusing a business competitively, making major changes in marketing or distribution, redirecting product development, and reshaping operations” (Guth & Ginsberg, 1990)2 ; “a process of extending the firm’s domain of competence and corresponding opportunity set through internally generated new resource combinations” (Burgelman, 1984)3 ; “a potentially viable means for promoting and sustaining organizational performance, renewal and corporate competitiveness” (C.Lakshmi Nath)4 , etc. Corporate entrepreneurship can be considered as: • refocusing business activities in the context of strategic networking, sharing of ideas and competition for knowledge resources inside and/or outside the company; • managing human capital for better performance, commitment, participation, involvement, social responsibility and added value through the application of intrinsic humanity, motivation, learned skills and tool manipulation (Drucker, 1992); 1 http://bcognizance.iiita.ac.in/aug-sep05/Corporate.htm 2 Ferreira, J. Corporate Entrepreneurship: a Strategic and Structural Perspective. International Council for Small Business, 47th World Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 16–19, 2002 3 Bulgerman, R. Designs for Corporate Entrepreneurship. California Management Review, 26, 1984, pp. 154–166 4 http://www.ediindia.org/Creed/data/C Lakshmi Nath.htm 4 • rethinking the vision, partnerships, substance of the strategic management; • building knowledge capacity and restructuring market through an implementation of changed rules of competition for the industries; • reinforcing the components of effective team work (communication, cooperation, collaboration, and compromise), etc. As Jon Katzenbach5 considers “real teams must follow a well-defined discipline in order to achieve their performance potential”. He has defined a real top management team (TMT) as a “small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, performance goals, and an approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable”. Most top management teams have to acknowledge that their environment is more complex and dynamic than ever before. They must be well acquainted with the tendencies in competition’s decisions on a course of actions to create value through strategic communication about the effective connection between objectives, possibilities and relationships. In this process of coordinating the activities and assets top management teams can more widely utilize their knowledge, skills, abilities and capabilities and initiate the creation of knowledge networks. THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS TO CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP According to Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub6 “effective knowledge networks increase innovation and improve organizational efficiency, but they can have even greater benefits if they are structured and receive management guidance”. Knowledge networks can: 5 http://www.schneede.se/assets/files/Top_Management_Team_Myth.pdf 6 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Building Knowledge-creating Value Networks. European Management Journal, Vol.20, No.6, 2002, pp. 587–596 5 • promote new ways of thinking and acting; • assure the independence of top management teams to develop their collaborations with partners in accordance with the potential contacts of knowledge-intensive organizations; • maintain people morale and team values of involvement, empowerment and sensitivity, etc. As Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub7 have pointed out “although more and more companies recognize the importance of knowledge networks, they have yet to discover how to build them”. There are four key stages of network development, i.e. knowledge networks need a focus on strategic business and corporate priorities, a creation of network context, routines of network activities and a leverage of network outcomes. Four types of knowledge networks have been identified: networks that primarily focus on individual benefits versus those that focus on organizational benefits and networks that are self-managed versus those that are supported by managers. • Hobby networks provide a context of individual interests, e.g. tennis, poetry, football, music, etc. The most significant outcome of this kind of networks is the personal satisfaction which can result in an increased productivity, an innovative thinking and new contacts of a friendship and commonly shared values. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship include: a valuebased self-management; an information flaw in development; an informal research incentives and discussions about the markets’ possibilities and gaps, different segments and the most important corporate events of the industry, etc. • Professional learning networks refer to the individual skill base. As it has been considered and described “knowledge transfer in these networks is spontaneous and ongoing, a natural by-product of work and mutual support” 7 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Op. cit. 6 (Lave & Wenger, 1991). The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship: individually added acquired knowledge; more intensive investigations of the professional environment; communication patterns of culture, priorities, interests in the professional community, long-term learning possibilities, etc. • Best-practice networks generate value through their institutionalized forms of knowledge sharing in organization. These networks focus on problemsolving and accumulating new knowledge as well as on the transfer of existing knowledge. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship: an emphasis on organization efficiency not only for the company but also for the industry; development and differentiation of the customer value proposition of the company; mutual support in creating the company’ s brand and identity, etc. • Business opportunity networks are entrepreneurial networks which are “potentially the most innovative and attractive from a growth perspective”. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship is referred to: changing of the existing business models; creating a new strategy map of the company (Kaplan & Norton, 2001)8 ; initiating new business activities and co operation, etc. The implementation of corporate entrepreneurship [Figure 1]: • creates a platform for increasing the human potential; • follows the market movements and the new competencies of the industry; • cultivates a positive attitude towards the knowledge economy; • implements networking as knowledge development of so-called “faster-learning organizations”, etc. 8 http://www.12manage.com/methods_strategy_maps_strategic_communication.html 7 NETWORK DEVELOPMENT IN A MANAGERIAL CONTEXT Network development could foster stability and prosperity, as well as, it could improve the quality of life of all involved members in the company by a protection of the rights, freedom, and individual choices. Networking encourages people to manage for performance, for promotion of culture and mutual confidence, for diverse communication and decision making. Knowledge networks protect the functioning of teams appropriately. Network development enacts the three conditions of accountability9 , namely: communicating clear and credible expectations, creating compelling consequences, and leading conversations grounded in empirical reality. The process of network development in a managerial context might pass three main stages as it is described below. First stage: Providing a focus on knowledge networks as a solution of the crisis management It’s clear that in the absence of knowledge capital about the crisis in the market development and global demand, adaptation is the best strategy. The knowledge networks can support the efforts of top management teams to look more broadly through the concepts of the changing matters in the industry and to foster specialization among partners as a way of prevailing over the unsecured environment and competition in uncertain times. Some initiatives may refer to: • formulating a shaping strategy. As John Hagel III, John Seely Brown et al.10 consider “changing the risk/reward calculus as you shape strategy in a time of rapid change involves three interrelated elements: a shaping view, which helps focus participants; a shaping platform, which provides leverage to reduce the investment and effort participants need to make; and specific shaping acts and 9 Grimshaw, J., Gr. Barron. Leadership without Excuses. McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010 10 Hagel III, J., J. Brown, L. Davison. Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption. Harvard Business Review, October, 2008, pp. 81–89 8 assets, which persuade participants that the shaper is serious and can pull off the shaping initiatives”; • strengthening the professional ties to assure common business activities. It might be important because of the possibility some business niches become insufficient and their competitive advantages could create conditions for differentiation as a strategy of success in the industry. This mutual reliance can mobilize all the assets and knowledge capital and the real market opportunities for the companies in the industrial network could be utilized for better individual and team performance; • emphasizing on core competences, capabilities and knowledge which can assure more control over the assets and activities that are of a core importance and value. This might be implemented by so called collaboration networks which could propose collaborative innovation and relationships with the most significant partners. If the collaboration is “totally open or crowdsourcing, everyone (suppliers, customers, designers, research institutions, inventors, students, hobbyists and even competitors) can participate.”11 In this way a sponsor who has declared a problem as a public one and then seeks support and suitable decisions from an unlimited number of problem solvers can contribute to his/her company and top management teams to use capabilities and assets of other people offered their knowledge and experience. It’s a competitive advantage to create and sustain an open network which can attract “an extremely large number of problem solvers, and consequently, a vast number of ideas”. Second stage: Changing business environment through HRM and activities of corporate entrepreneurship 11 Pisano, G., R. Verganti. Which Kind of Collaboration Is Right for You? Harvard Business Review, December, 2008 9 The challenging market environment presupposes changes in business activities. Some new ventures are undertaken because of faraway markets. The distances create differences in time, resources, competencies and priorities. As it is said in Daniel Isenberg’s article12 “a greater challenge for global entrepreneurs is bridging what the British economist Wilfred Beckerman called in 1956 “psychic distance””. This arises from a variety of reasons, such as culture, language, education level, political systems, religious preferences and economic development. Sometimes, so called global entrepreneurs have to deal with several different segments of the global market, which is a complex job. They must cope with the law and jurisdictions of foreign countries and offer their commodities as well as their skills and levels of quality. These tasks of the corporate entrepreneurship in a great extent change the business environment. An adequate HRM is a prerequisite of a successful global business. The major challenges for HRM refer to: • globalization and information technologies’ development; • cultural diversity and social responsibility; • growing needs of a flexibility in organizational structuring; • creating and maintenance of a high commitment and high performance business; • competency and human resources’ development in the process of an implementation of organization’s quality policy13; • asymmetries of the globalization process which ruin the balance of the power positions and “the world desperately makes an attempt to re-establish the balance by introducing new actors on the stage or trying to restrict the role of the 12 Isenberg, D. The Global Entrepreneur. Harvard Business Review, December, 2008, pp.107–111 13 Pavlov, Pl. A Process Design of the Quality Management System in Line with the International Standard ISO 9001:2008. Varna Free University, 2010, p. 40 10 active ones, but for the present mainly through moral-ethical appeals for responsibility towards the idea of a fair society and sustainable development ”14; • the flexibility and the dynamics of the business development. Therefore the choice of an appropriate business model has already become a continuous management problem, which can be solved as “a purposeful process of a prompt and comprehensive change of the behavior and the skills of the personnel and management in the organization, as well of the different structures and processes in it.”15; • the new development approach could be “focused on supporting the linkages among the sectors, rather than direct investment in the sectors. The understanding of investment in linkages is: investments (of money, time, information, human resources, etc.) in initiatives to eliminate, restrict, encourage or establish linkages (financial, information, human resources, materials, services) between sectors, taking into consideration an integrated economical, social and ecological dimensions”16, etc. The knowledge networks could foster the corporate entrepreneurship through different activities of diaspora networks which give assistance to global entrepreneurs and they “can quickly gain access to information, funding, talent, technology – and, of course, contacts.”17 The processes of a formulation and an execution of the global strategy include the ethnic networks as a competitive advantage of the company. The other useful type of networking is a map network 14 Nedyalkova, A., Z. Bauman, D. Filipov. Globalism, Regionalism and Antiglobalism. Albatros, Sofia, 2005, p. 151 15 Dimitrov, N. The Actual Models of the Business Processes’ Management in the Enterprise. Papers of Round Table “The Current Models of the Business Processes’ Management in the Enterprise”, Varna Free University, 2010, p. 6 16 Pavlov, D. A New Linkage Approach to River Economic Complex Development. Avangard Print House, Ruse, 2010, pp. 14–15 17 Isenberg, D. Op. cit. 11 which is a diaspora of members often clustered in residential areas, public organizations, or industries. Herminia Ibarra and Mark Hunter (2007)18 have discovered that the most important forms of networking are operational, personal, and strategic. The first contributes to management of current internal responsibilities, the second one boots personal development, and the third type addresses strategic issues to new business directions. When the topic of the day is the overall business of the company “many managers do not immediately grasp that this will involve relational – not analytical – tasks. Nor do they easily understand that exchanges and interactions with a diverse array of current and potential stakeholders are not distractions from their “real work” but are actually at the heart of their new leadership roles.”19 The networking and the implementation of the corporate entrepreneurship could be challenges of a new leader’s development plan. As in any group or team in an organization, networks sustain different roles for development. Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub20 have pointed out that “in the most effective networks we observe a pattern of four typical roles that were systematically used to provide a backbone to the network.” These roles include four main types: coordinator, support, editor, and sponsor. The network coordinators are the chief organizers, event hosts, troubleshoots and fundamental sources of energy in a network. The coordinator has the task to identify the members of the knowledge network and possibilities of corporate entrepreneurship; to maintain the processes of assessing the health of the network, and the linking people. The coordinator uses a support structure with different shapes (when it is necessary). In its simplest type it may be an 18 Ibarra, H., M. Hunter. How Leaders Create and Use Networks. Harvard Business Review, January, 2007 19 Ibarra, H., M. Hunter. Op. cit., p 41 20 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Op. cit. 12 administrative assistant handling the operational activities of the network. The assistant’s functions may include the organization and exchange of information generated by network members, the maintenance of the network’s databases and intranet site as well as scheduling and organizing the network meetings. With this support, coordinator can participate more actively in the processes of the network and secure the effective network maintenance which is crucial in the initial stages of network development. The support structure also offers continuous coaching to “nascent networks in terms of information and communication technology and effective organizing mechanisms.” The other important role in the networking is an editor who validates the content of the knowledge network, as well as, does the synthesizing and integrating the knowledge resources. Highly effective networks rely on a sponsor who has a leading role in: • providing resources, recognition and rewards; • guiding long – term strategic alignment; • supporting top management teams, etc. The sponsor is not necessarily a member of the network, but keeps contact with it and maintains the coordinator’s work and activities, reviews network tasks, contributes to implementing the company’s goals in compliance with business/corporate strategy and secures appropriate support when needed. All these roles of networking increase innovation possibilities; enrich relationships’ content and improve organizational efficiency of the company. Third stage: Maintaining the reward system in accordance with network results Donna Deeprose (2007)21 has noted that “recognizing and rewarding employees for their superior performance leads to superior organizational performance”. To reinforce the connection between rewards and network results, 21 Deeprose, D. How to Recognize and Reward Employees. AMACOM, New York, 2007 13 top management teams could focus the reward system of the company on efficient strategies for building successful knowledge networks inside and/or outside the organization. It might be a decision of a specific situation that “anyone – manager or employee – can recognize another individual or team for actions aligned with company strategies such as Build the Team, Satisfy the Customer, Deliver Our Family of Business, or Work Smarter, Not Harder”22. If a team or individual get a recognition, top manager could offer rewards of own choice, i.e. everyone who has recognition from his/her colleagues or a team leader is encouraged to specify his/her preferences for rewards. The reward system must stimulate behavior of responsibility that supports company strategies for an implementation of effective business activities leading to a positive image and better professional relationships. It’s really important that people do not work only for money but also “for a number of other returns to justify the time, energy, and mental and emotional effort they devote to the organization.” Therefore the total rewards package includes the salary and financial benefits, as well as business environment, professional friendships and contacts, learning and development schedules, and work/life balance. As Donna Deeprose considers “equity requires that total rewards meet the needs of employees to the same degree that employees contribute to meeting the objective of the organization”. 23 Value – based rewards could differentiate the efforts and results of building knowledge networks as an objective of the corporate entrepreneurship of the company. Value – based rewards could also affirm strong value orientations, attitudes and behavior that make members of knowledge networks proud. If the top management team of the company has financial difficulties and a limited budget, it’s not necessarily value – based rewards to be bound up with a huge 22 Deeprose, D. Op. cit., p. 5 23 Deeprose, D. Op. cit., p. 12 14 amount of money or/and financial assets. More important is the knowledge of top performers that their financial rewards are substantially above average in the company. Top performers who are the engine of the corporate entrepreneurship in the company are motivated primarily by challenge and recognition. Some challenge – rewards for high – performing employees of knowledge networks could include: • a choice of their own projects and contacts; • time and resources to design and work on different projects; • an opportunity for a project management of cross – functional teams; • an attendance of conferences, formal and informal meetings of knowledge society and high – ranked representatives of the corporate entrepreneurship; • a preparation of experts’ papers on current problems or tendencies, etc. CONCLUSION Adding value through knowledge is a crucial matter in nowadays business reality. Corporate entrepreneurship as a variety of knowledge networks focuses on the organizing function as a prerequisite for: employee satisfaction and loyalty, promotion of new skills and abilities, building human capital and strong professional relationships. Top management teams could contribute to continuous innovation in a wider content and to accumulation of tacit knowledge, as well as, to lead the company towards sustainable development. 15 Figure 1 The implementation of corporate entrepreneurship through knowledge networks THE PLATFORM OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP • increasing of the transparency of all business activities and processes; • creating a professional communities of knowledge and practice; • providing assurance about the longterm commitment in the industry; • improving cost structure, asset utilization, revenue opportunities that secure the growth strategy of the company. THE CONCEPT OF KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS • define directions for strategic business and corporate goals; • identify opportunities, inside outside links and professional contacts; • describe the value of different kinds of knowledge; • provide new combination of resources and new knowledge. THE ACTIVITIES AND ASSETS • differentiate fields of actions through competency-based management; • foster mutual reliance and confidence among partners in one industry; • encourage the creation of value networks; • promote innovation renewal as a condition sine qua non for business development and social responsibility.

    In this day time black lives matter the financial executives Holly wood a community forum the Social media black lives organization mis-directives. The net gross salary of Queen Empress Imminent danger report basic impact Jayana Khan of private investigator bodyguard anthropology Black lives matter. The platform of corporate Entrepreneurship • increasing of the transparency of all business activities and processes illuminati dilation Hollywood mis in certainty ; • creating a professional communities of knowledge and practice; • providing assurance about the long term commitment in the industry; • improving cost structure, asset utilization, revenue opportunities that secure the growth strategy of the company. Seven billion Jedi chakras existence incomplete Holly wood Corporate Entrepreneurship top Empress Jayana Khan Black lives matter by any means necessary figuring black survival guide. Self-anointed seven billion Jedi chakras self determination Empress Jayana Khan The info commons channel of self taught creative money wealth resolution individualism basic guide info commons poor inner state minimum multi police ta-chi

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    Given the recent interest in problem solving and academia, this article seeks to provide a short overview of current law school classes that touch on topics of problem-solving justice. Courses and clinics are organized into five basic categories: problem-solving courts, community prosecution, restorative justice, problem-solving lawyering, and therapeutic jurisprudence. The list was compiled with the help of Michael Cobden, based on interviews and web searches. It is not intended to be exhaustive or definitive. Rather, it seeks to provide a snapshot of a rapidly developing field by highlighting courses from law schools around the country. Note that this overview is limited to law school classes and does not include courses on problem solving at graduate schools in other disciplines (e.g., criminology, public policy, social work).

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    International grant-giving by US foundations doubled since 1998, although the proportion of the foundations which work in the area of development assistance has declined.


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    Interestingly, the main developing countries that directly receive international assistance from U.S. foundations are the top emerging markets, including Russia, Brazil, India, China, Mexico, and South Africa14. The poorest countries seem to be benefiting only slightly on the margins from foundations’ direct international flows, largely due to the difficulty with accessing information and with the process of the assistance’s implementation

    The first course focuses is on preventive lawyering, holistic representation and civil matters. Students are assigned a variety of readings including articles profiling attorneys who utilize therapeutic methods in their practice. Traditional cases are re-examined with an eye towards how they might have been handled differently from a preventive or holistic perspective. Students engage in mock interviews and role-playing exercises, some of which are based on real case files and some of which are scripted. Outside speakers from other departments in the University of Miami inform the class of other disciplines and how they might contribute to the understanding of the client’s perspective. In the final phase of this course, students conduct supervised interviews of clients who are in the custody of a juvenile detention facility and prepare memoranda which are shared with the public defender’s office.

    The second course focuses on studying and attempting to reform substantive legal rules and legal procedures. Students will prepare a 30-40 page paper on a therapeutic jurisprudence topic or theme and will have the opportunity to participate in research or law reform activities conducted by the Therapeutic Jurisprudence Center. After more than a generation of punitive, “tough-on-crime” rhetoric and policymaking, there is now a fairly broad political consensus in the United States that we have gone too far in our use of incarceration.

    Indeed, just a few weeks ago, the White House unveiled the Data-Driven Justice Initiative, a partnership of 67 jurisdictions—big and small, conservative and liberal—committed to using data to reduce incarceration.


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    Each time a domestic violence story is covered, media has an opportunity to save lives.


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    Listing The Hotline as a Resource

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    CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIPTOP MANAGEMENT TEAMS’ KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS Assist. Prof. Dr. Daniela Dimitrova Popova Department “Administration and Management” Varna Free University In times of global crisis and increasing pressures on companies to follow strategies for a competitive position on the global markets many top management executives have to apply different approaches referred to corporate entrepreneurship and the creation and maintenance of knowledge networks. The demanding knowledge economy prerequisites the reshaping of markets; new forms of competitive advantages based on business development and effective combinations of resources; an outside orientation to customers, suppliers, shareholders, business partners and other interest groups, etc. The purpose of the paper is some characteristics of the corporate entrepreneurship in relation with the knowledge networks to be outlined. The used theories include Bettina Büchel’s and Steffen Raub’s knowledge networks’ model, Kaplan’s and Norton’s proposal for building a strategy map and different concepts of corporate entrepreneurship. The applied research method is a literature review. The contribution of this theoretical research is referred to the suggested platform of corporate entrepreneurship in connection with the concept of knowledge networks. THE ESSENCE OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP’S CONCEPT The concept of corporate entrepreneurship has been discussed and developed over the years (Peterson & Berger, 1971; Zahra, 1991; Kuratko & Hornsby, 1993; Guth & Ginsberg, 1990; Ferreira, 2002, etc.). Sathe (1989) defined it as a process of organizational renewal. Other researchers have 3 conceptualized corporate entrepreneurship as: “the process of creating new business within established firms to improve organizational profitability and enhance a firm’s competitive position or the strategic renewal of existing business” (Zahra, 1991)1 ; “corporate venturing, or new business development within an existing firm, which is only one of the possible ways to achieve strategic renewal. Strategic renewal involves the creation of new wealth through new combinations of resources. This includes actions such as refocusing a business competitively, making major changes in marketing or distribution, redirecting product development, and reshaping operations” (Guth & Ginsberg, 1990)2 ; “a process of extending the firm’s domain of competence and corresponding opportunity set through internally generated new resource combinations” (Burgelman, 1984)3 ; “a potentially viable means for promoting and sustaining organizational performance, renewal and corporate competitiveness” (C.Lakshmi Nath)4 , etc. Corporate entrepreneurship can be considered as: • refocusing business activities in the context of strategic networking, sharing of ideas and competition for knowledge resources inside and/or outside the company; • managing human capital for better performance, commitment, participation, involvement, social responsibility and added value through the application of intrinsic humanity, motivation, learned skills and tool manipulation (Drucker, 1992); 1 http://bcognizance.iiita.ac.in/aug-sep05/Corporate.htm 2 Ferreira, J. Corporate Entrepreneurship: a Strategic and Structural Perspective. International Council for Small Business, 47th World Conference, San Juan, Puerto Rico, June 16–19, 2002 3 Bulgerman, R. Designs for Corporate Entrepreneurship. California Management Review, 26, 1984, pp. 154–166 4 http://www.ediindia.org/Creed/data/C Lakshmi Nath.htm 4 • rethinking the vision, partnerships, substance of the strategic management; • building knowledge capacity and restructuring market through an implementation of changed rules of competition for the industries; • reinforcing the components of effective team work (communication, cooperation, collaboration, and compromise), etc. As Jon Katzenbach5 considers “real teams must follow a well-defined discipline in order to achieve their performance potential”. He has defined a real top management team (TMT) as a “small number of people with complementary skills who are committed to a common purpose, performance goals, and an approach for which they hold themselves mutually accountable”. Most top management teams have to acknowledge that their environment is more complex and dynamic than ever before. They must be well acquainted with the tendencies in competition’s decisions on a course of actions to create value through strategic communication about the effective connection between objectives, possibilities and relationships. In this process of coordinating the activities and assets top management teams can more widely utilize their knowledge, skills, abilities and capabilities and initiate the creation of knowledge networks. THE IMPORTANCE OF KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS TO CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP According to Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub6 “effective knowledge networks increase innovation and improve organizational efficiency, but they can have even greater benefits if they are structured and receive management guidance”. Knowledge networks can: 5 http://www.schneede.se/assets/files/Top_Management_Team_Myth.pdf 6 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Building Knowledge-creating Value Networks. European Management Journal, Vol.20, No.6, 2002, pp. 587–596 5 • promote new ways of thinking and acting; • assure the independence of top management teams to develop their collaborations with partners in accordance with the potential contacts of knowledge-intensive organizations; • maintain people morale and team values of involvement, empowerment and sensitivity, etc. As Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub7 have pointed out “although more and more companies recognize the importance of knowledge networks, they have yet to discover how to build them”. There are four key stages of network development, i.e. knowledge networks need a focus on strategic business and corporate priorities, a creation of network context, routines of network activities and a leverage of network outcomes. Four types of knowledge networks have been identified: networks that primarily focus on individual benefits versus those that focus on organizational benefits and networks that are self-managed versus those that are supported by managers. • Hobby networks provide a context of individual interests, e.g. tennis, poetry, football, music, etc. The most significant outcome of this kind of networks is the personal satisfaction which can result in an increased productivity, an innovative thinking and new contacts of a friendship and commonly shared values. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship include: a valuebased self-management; an information flaw in development; an informal research incentives and discussions about the markets’ possibilities and gaps, different segments and the most important corporate events of the industry, etc. • Professional learning networks refer to the individual skill base. As it has been considered and described “knowledge transfer in these networks is spontaneous and ongoing, a natural by-product of work and mutual support” 7 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Op. cit. 6 (Lave & Wenger, 1991). The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship: individually added acquired knowledge; more intensive investigations of the professional environment; communication patterns of culture, priorities, interests in the professional community, long-term learning possibilities, etc. • Best-practice networks generate value through their institutionalized forms of knowledge sharing in organization. These networks focus on problemsolving and accumulating new knowledge as well as on the transfer of existing knowledge. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship: an emphasis on organization efficiency not only for the company but also for the industry; development and differentiation of the customer value proposition of the company; mutual support in creating the company’ s brand and identity, etc. • Business opportunity networks are entrepreneurial networks which are “potentially the most innovative and attractive from a growth perspective”. The contributions for the corporate entrepreneurship is referred to: changing of the existing business models; creating a new strategy map of the company (Kaplan & Norton, 2001)8 ; initiating new business activities and co operation, etc. The implementation of corporate entrepreneurship [Figure 1]: • creates a platform for increasing the human potential; • follows the market movements and the new competencies of the industry; • cultivates a positive attitude towards the knowledge economy; • implements networking as knowledge development of so-called “faster-learning organizations”, etc. 8 http://www.12manage.com/methods_strategy_maps_strategic_communication.html 7 NETWORK DEVELOPMENT IN A MANAGERIAL CONTEXT Network development could foster stability and prosperity, as well as, it could improve the quality of life of all involved members in the company by a protection of the rights, freedom, and individual choices. Networking encourages people to manage for performance, for promotion of culture and mutual confidence, for diverse communication and decision making. Knowledge networks protect the functioning of teams appropriately. Network development enacts the three conditions of accountability9 , namely: communicating clear and credible expectations, creating compelling consequences, and leading conversations grounded in empirical reality. The process of network development in a managerial context might pass three main stages as it is described below. First stage: Providing a focus on knowledge networks as a solution of the crisis management It’s clear that in the absence of knowledge capital about the crisis in the market development and global demand, adaptation is the best strategy. The knowledge networks can support the efforts of top management teams to look more broadly through the concepts of the changing matters in the industry and to foster specialization among partners as a way of prevailing over the unsecured environment and competition in uncertain times. Some initiatives may refer to: • formulating a shaping strategy. As John Hagel III, John Seely Brown et al.10 consider “changing the risk/reward calculus as you shape strategy in a time of rapid change involves three interrelated elements: a shaping view, which helps focus participants; a shaping platform, which provides leverage to reduce the investment and effort participants need to make; and specific shaping acts and 9 Grimshaw, J., Gr. Barron. Leadership without Excuses. McGraw-Hill, New York, 2010 10 Hagel III, J., J. Brown, L. Davison. Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption. Harvard Business Review, October, 2008, pp. 81–89 8 assets, which persuade participants that the shaper is serious and can pull off the shaping initiatives”; • strengthening the professional ties to assure common business activities. It might be important because of the possibility some business niches become insufficient and their competitive advantages could create conditions for differentiation as a strategy of success in the industry. This mutual reliance can mobilize all the assets and knowledge capital and the real market opportunities for the companies in the industrial network could be utilized for better individual and team performance; • emphasizing on core competences, capabilities and knowledge which can assure more control over the assets and activities that are of a core importance and value. This might be implemented by so called collaboration networks which could propose collaborative innovation and relationships with the most significant partners. If the collaboration is “totally open or crowdsourcing, everyone (suppliers, customers, designers, research institutions, inventors, students, hobbyists and even competitors) can participate.”11 In this way a sponsor who has declared a problem as a public one and then seeks support and suitable decisions from an unlimited number of problem solvers can contribute to his/her company and top management teams to use capabilities and assets of other people offered their knowledge and experience. It’s a competitive advantage to create and sustain an open network which can attract “an extremely large number of problem solvers, and consequently, a vast number of ideas”. Second stage: Changing business environment through HRM and activities of corporate entrepreneurship 11 Pisano, G., R. Verganti. Which Kind of Collaboration Is Right for You? Harvard Business Review, December, 2008 9 The challenging market environment presupposes changes in business activities. Some new ventures are undertaken because of faraway markets. The distances create differences in time, resources, competencies and priorities. As it is said in Daniel Isenberg’s article12 “a greater challenge for global entrepreneurs is bridging what the British economist Wilfred Beckerman called in 1956 “psychic distance””. This arises from a variety of reasons, such as culture, language, education level, political systems, religious preferences and economic development. Sometimes, so called global entrepreneurs have to deal with several different segments of the global market, which is a complex job. They must cope with the law and jurisdictions of foreign countries and offer their commodities as well as their skills and levels of quality. These tasks of the corporate entrepreneurship in a great extent change the business environment. An adequate HRM is a prerequisite of a successful global business. The major challenges for HRM refer to: • globalization and information technologies’ development; • cultural diversity and social responsibility; • growing needs of a flexibility in organizational structuring; • creating and maintenance of a high commitment and high performance business; • competency and human resources’ development in the process of an implementation of organization’s quality policy13; • asymmetries of the globalization process which ruin the balance of the power positions and “the world desperately makes an attempt to re-establish the balance by introducing new actors on the stage or trying to restrict the role of the 12 Isenberg, D. The Global Entrepreneur. Harvard Business Review, December, 2008, pp.107–111 13 Pavlov, Pl. A Process Design of the Quality Management System in Line with the International Standard ISO 9001:2008. Varna Free University, 2010, p. 40 10 active ones, but for the present mainly through moral-ethical appeals for responsibility towards the idea of a fair society and sustainable development ”14; • the flexibility and the dynamics of the business development. Therefore the choice of an appropriate business model has already become a continuous management problem, which can be solved as “a purposeful process of a prompt and comprehensive change of the behavior and the skills of the personnel and management in the organization, as well of the different structures and processes in it.”15; • the new development approach could be “focused on supporting the linkages among the sectors, rather than direct investment in the sectors. The understanding of investment in linkages is: investments (of money, time, information, human resources, etc.) in initiatives to eliminate, restrict, encourage or establish linkages (financial, information, human resources, materials, services) between sectors, taking into consideration an integrated economical, social and ecological dimensions”16, etc. The knowledge networks could foster the corporate entrepreneurship through different activities of diaspora networks which give assistance to global entrepreneurs and they “can quickly gain access to information, funding, talent, technology – and, of course, contacts.”17 The processes of a formulation and an execution of the global strategy include the ethnic networks as a competitive advantage of the company. The other useful type of networking is a map network 14 Nedyalkova, A., Z. Bauman, D. Filipov. Globalism, Regionalism and Antiglobalism. Albatros, Sofia, 2005, p. 151 15 Dimitrov, N. The Actual Models of the Business Processes’ Management in the Enterprise. Papers of Round Table “The Current Models of the Business Processes’ Management in the Enterprise”, Varna Free University, 2010, p. 6 16 Pavlov, D. A New Linkage Approach to River Economic Complex Development. Avangard Print House, Ruse, 2010, pp. 14–15 17 Isenberg, D. Op. cit. 11 which is a diaspora of members often clustered in residential areas, public organizations, or industries. Herminia Ibarra and Mark Hunter (2007)18 have discovered that the most important forms of networking are operational, personal, and strategic. The first contributes to management of current internal responsibilities, the second one boots personal development, and the third type addresses strategic issues to new business directions. When the topic of the day is the overall business of the company “many managers do not immediately grasp that this will involve relational – not analytical – tasks. Nor do they easily understand that exchanges and interactions with a diverse array of current and potential stakeholders are not distractions from their “real work” but are actually at the heart of their new leadership roles.”19 The networking and the implementation of the corporate entrepreneurship could be challenges of a new leader’s development plan. As in any group or team in an organization, networks sustain different roles for development. Bettina Büchel and Steffen Raub20 have pointed out that “in the most effective networks we observe a pattern of four typical roles that were systematically used to provide a backbone to the network.” These roles include four main types: coordinator, support, editor, and sponsor. The network coordinators are the chief organizers, event hosts, troubleshoots and fundamental sources of energy in a network. The coordinator has the task to identify the members of the knowledge network and possibilities of corporate entrepreneurship; to maintain the processes of assessing the health of the network, and the linking people. The coordinator uses a support structure with different shapes (when it is necessary). In its simplest type it may be an 18 Ibarra, H., M. Hunter. How Leaders Create and Use Networks. Harvard Business Review, January, 2007 19 Ibarra, H., M. Hunter. Op. cit., p 41 20 Büchel, B., St. Raub. Op. cit. 12 administrative assistant handling the operational activities of the network. The assistant’s functions may include the organization and exchange of information generated by network members, the maintenance of the network’s databases and intranet site as well as scheduling and organizing the network meetings. With this support, coordinator can participate more actively in the processes of the network and secure the effective network maintenance which is crucial in the initial stages of network development. The support structure also offers continuous coaching to “nascent networks in terms of information and communication technology and effective organizing mechanisms.” The other important role in the networking is an editor who validates the content of the knowledge network, as well as, does the synthesizing and integrating the knowledge resources. Highly effective networks rely on a sponsor who has a leading role in: • providing resources, recognition and rewards; • guiding long – term strategic alignment; • supporting top management teams, etc. The sponsor is not necessarily a member of the network, but keeps contact with it and maintains the coordinator’s work and activities, reviews network tasks, contributes to implementing the company’s goals in compliance with business/corporate strategy and secures appropriate support when needed. All these roles of networking increase innovation possibilities; enrich relationships’ content and improve organizational efficiency of the company. Third stage: Maintaining the reward system in accordance with network results Donna Deeprose (2007)21 has noted that “recognizing and rewarding employees for their superior performance leads to superior organizational performance”. To reinforce the connection between rewards and network results, 21 Deeprose, D. How to Recognize and Reward Employees. AMACOM, New York, 2007 13 top management teams could focus the reward system of the company on efficient strategies for building successful knowledge networks inside and/or outside the organization. It might be a decision of a specific situation that “anyone – manager or employee – can recognize another individual or team for actions aligned with company strategies such as Build the Team, Satisfy the Customer, Deliver Our Family of Business, or Work Smarter, Not Harder”22. If a team or individual get a recognition, top manager could offer rewards of own choice, i.e. everyone who has recognition from his/her colleagues or a team leader is encouraged to specify his/her preferences for rewards. The reward system must stimulate behavior of responsibility that supports company strategies for an implementation of effective business activities leading to a positive image and better professional relationships. It’s really important that people do not work only for money but also “for a number of other returns to justify the time, energy, and mental and emotional effort they devote to the organization.” Therefore the total rewards package includes the salary and financial benefits, as well as business environment, professional friendships and contacts, learning and development schedules, and work/life balance. As Donna Deeprose considers “equity requires that total rewards meet the needs of employees to the same degree that employees contribute to meeting the objective of the organization”. 23 Value – based rewards could differentiate the efforts and results of building knowledge networks as an objective of the corporate entrepreneurship of the company. Value – based rewards could also affirm strong value orientations, attitudes and behavior that make members of knowledge networks proud. If the top management team of the company has financial difficulties and a limited budget, it’s not necessarily value – based rewards to be bound up with a huge 22 Deeprose, D. Op. cit., p. 5 23 Deeprose, D. Op. cit., p. 12 14 amount of money or/and financial assets. More important is the knowledge of top performers that their financial rewards are substantially above average in the company. Top performers who are the engine of the corporate entrepreneurship in the company are motivated primarily by challenge and recognition. Some challenge – rewards for high – performing employees of knowledge networks could include: • a choice of their own projects and contacts; • time and resources to design and work on different projects; • an opportunity for a project management of cross – functional teams; • an attendance of conferences, formal and informal meetings of knowledge society and high – ranked representatives of the corporate entrepreneurship; • a preparation of experts’ papers on current problems or tendencies, etc. CONCLUSION Adding value through knowledge is a crucial matter in nowadays business reality. Corporate entrepreneurship as a variety of knowledge networks focuses on the organizing function as a prerequisite for: employee satisfaction and loyalty, promotion of new skills and abilities, building human capital and strong professional relationships. Top management teams could contribute to continuous innovation in a wider content and to accumulation of tacit knowledge, as well as, to lead the company towards sustainable development. 15 Figure 1 The implementation of corporate entrepreneurship through knowledge networks THE PLATFORM OF CORPORATE ENTREPRENEURSHIP • increasing of the transparency of all business activities and processes; • creating a professional communities of knowledge and practice; • providing assurance about the longterm commitment in the industry; • improving cost structure, asset utilization, revenue opportunities that secure the growth strategy of the company. THE CONCEPT OF KNOWLEDGE NETWORKS • define directions for strategic business and corporate goals; • identify opportunities, inside outside links and professional contacts; • describe the value of different kinds of knowledge; • provide new combination of resources and new knowledge. THE ACTIVITIES AND ASSETS • differentiate fields of actions through competency-based management; • foster mutual reliance and confidence among partners in one industry; • encourage the creation of value networks; • promote innovation renewal as a condition sine qua non for business development and social responsibility.

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